Generations of American leaders from across the political spectrum have supported the goal of a bipartisan foreign policy. The U.S. Institute of Peace, a congressionally funded national institute, advances this objective with a series of Bipartisan Congressional Dialogues. USIP brings together leaders from both political parties in public discussions to develop solutions for urgent national security and foreign policy problems.

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In each dialogue of the series, Republican and Democratic members of Congress join USIP leaders to discuss their shared interest in a specific foreign policy challenge and examine ways to address the problem.

Bipartisan Congressional Dialogues have tackled such hot-button national security topics as the role of human rights in global peace and stability, terrorism and evolving cybersecurity threats, negotiations with North Korea, Russia’s role in Europe, preventing wildlife poaching and trafficking and China's growing international influence.

This series furthers USIP’s congressional mission to reduce violent conflict abroad in accordance with America’s national interests and values. USIP, an institution that symbolizes the United States’ commitment to peace, provides a unique, nonpartisan, foreign policy forum for these discussions.

Past Events

Chris Stewart (R-UT), Nancy Lindborg, and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD)

China: Managing Conflict and Competition

September 27, 2018

Representatives Chris Stewart (R-UT) and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD) discussed preserving U.S. national security interests with China’s growing international influence at USIP’s sixth Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue. Both representatives are members of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs. Stewart serves on the House Intelligence Committee and Ruppersberger is a former ranking member of the committee.

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Countering Illicit Funding of Terrorism: A Congressional Approach

April 17, 2018

Representatives Steve Pearce (R-NM) and Jim Himes (D-CT) discussed evolving cybersecurity threats to U.S. interests at USIP’s second Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue on a bipartisan approach to evolving cybersecurity threats. Representatives Pearce and Himes are both Members of the House Financial Services Subcommittee on Terrorism and Illicit Finance, and Representative Pearce is the Chairman of this Subcommittee.

Latest Publications

Johnny Walsh on Election Season in Afghanistan

Johnny Walsh on Election Season in Afghanistan

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

By: Johnny Walsh

As Afghans wait for official results from the parliamentary polls, Johnny Walsh says that the country is already entering “high political season” in preparation for the critical April 2019 presidential election. Although the Taliban continues to carry out high-profile attacks across the country, Walsh says that many Afghans are focused on the presidential polls and its implications for the peace process.

Democracy & Governance

Providing for the Common Defense

Providing for the Common Defense

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

By: National Defense Strategy Commission

The final report of the National Defense Strategy Commission is a compilation of the assessments of the National Defense Strategy and recommendations based on its analysis related not just to defense strategy, but also to the larger geopolitical environment in which that strategy must be executed. They consulted with civilian and military leaders in the Department of Defense, representatives of other U.S. government departments and agencies, allied diplomats and military officials, and independent experts.

Global Policy

Thomas Hill on Libya

Thomas Hill on Libya

Friday, November 9, 2018

By: Thomas M. Hill

Since the fall of Muammar Qaddafi in 2011, successive U.S. administrations have watched Libya’s continuing collapse, mistakenly believing that the country’s unraveling threatens only Europe, says Thomas Hill. Ahead of the Palermo conference, which aims to find a solution to the crisis in Libya, Hill says that United States’ should play a more direct role in stabilizing the country.

Democracy & Governance; Conflict Analysis & Prevention

Libya’s Migrant Crisis Isn’t Just a European Problem

Libya’s Migrant Crisis Isn’t Just a European Problem

Friday, November 9, 2018

By: Thomas M. Hill; Emily Estelle

Next week, Italy will host an international conference intended to finally bring Libya’s bloody seven-year conflict toward resolution. Since the ouster of Muammar Qaddafi in 2011, successive U.S. administrations have watched Libya’s continuing collapse, believing that the country’s unraveling threatens only Europe. This is a mistake.

Fragility & Resilience

Nigeria’s Worst Violence Is Not Boko Haram

Nigeria’s Worst Violence Is Not Boko Haram

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

By: Ena Dion; Isioma Kemakolam

As Nigeria works to stabilize from years of warfare in its north, the deadliest threat is not the Boko Haram extremist movement, but escalating battles between farming and herding communities over scarce land and water. Bloodshed has increased since January, as armed groups have attacked and...

Justice, Security & Rule of Law

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